Home | Info | Propagation | Soil & tools | Potting | Rooting | Logs | Shade | Containers | Landscaping

Potting 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Roots | Repotting a Peruvian Torch seedling
Large section (36") propagation
1-large cactus limb, 36", with healed cut
5-gallon container
Compost/sand/perlite rich soil mix.
3-five ft, 1/2 inch PVC pipes for supports
Green plastic garden tie ribbon

This is a mature tip from an old plant. The section is 36 inches long and quite thick at the base. The "trick" to propagating large sections is basically mechanical support to keep the section stable while it roots.
• The cut end must be "healed" or callused
• Place about 4-inches deep in well draining mix
• Mechanically support the section
• Keep in a shady area until it roots
• Do not water for 2-4 weeks and then lightly
• Watch for new growth at tip + ribs fattening
• Wait until it has roots before watering/fertilizing

It is best to use the 5-gallon container only 2/3 filled with dirt to allow both a low center of gravity and adequate room for watering. Very deep soil—filling to the top of the container—is simply not necessary.

You do not want this plant to dry out. Just because it is a cactus does not mean it wants to live in dry sand! This species loves rich soil, plant food, and water.

<Click for a large size image>

Support pipes
Shove five foot long, 1/2", PVC pipes down along the sides of the container (as far from the rooting section as you can) in a triangle pattern. Plant the 36" section about 4-5 inches deep. Tie the pipes as shown in the photo to hold the limb upright.

Water the soil
Store your new cutting in a partially shaded area—not direct sun where it might overheat. It will develop roots in the next few months.

Rooting
You will see the success of the rooting as new growth appears at the tip. You can gauge the extent of the root system by the vertical ribs. If the ribs suck in (appear thin and flabby) the plant is water starved. But if the ribs are firm and full (look at the ribs of this photo) then it has rooted and is pulling in the water it needs.

<Click for a large size image>
With my arm in the picture you can get an idea of scale—this is a large diameter limb.

<Click for a large size image>
With a large container, leave space on top--do not fill it to the brim with dirt. The propagation will be more mechanically stable due to the low center of gravity. Watering, moving the plant, will all be easier and less likely to cause problems.
© 2004—2014 By Verne & the furry Angels. All rights reserved for eternity.  Contact: raccoony@sacredcactus.com